Military and Supporting Services


This includes all military ranks.

Account Names

Daniel Jenifer Adams (1751–1796), of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md., entered, in 1772, into a trading partnership with GW, Samuel Brodie, and John Carlyle, whereby flour refined at GW's and ... Read More

Sampson Darrell (d. 1777) was from Fairfax County, Va., where he served for a time as sheriff. He had also served with the rank of captain in the Fairfax County militia during the French and ... Read More

John Francis Mercer (1759-1821) was the son of John Mercer (1704-1768) of Marlborough in Stafford County, Virginia, and the half brother to George and James Mercer. He was commissioned a ... Read More

John Banister (1734–1788) was a planter and lawyer whose estate Battersea was near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia. He served in the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1765 to 1775 and in ... Read More

Dudley Digges (1718–1790) of York County and Williamsburg, Va., was a member of the committee appointed in 1756 to supervise the expenditure of funds for the Virginia Regiment. The Virginia ... Read More

A native of Falmouth, England, Eleazer Oswald (d. 1795) had immigrated to America in 1770, and was apprenticed to John Holt, the printer of the New-York Journal. During the Revolutionary ... Read More

Abraham Barnes (died c.1778) resided for many years in St. Mary's County, Maryland. He was a merchant, who held several public offices. Barnes was also engaged for a time in military service, ... Read More

In 1766 Robert Donaldson petitioned the Virginia House of Burgesses for assistance, claiming that he had "received several Wounds in the Service" of Virginia, and that he was blind and ... Read More

John Posey was a captain of the 2d company of artificers in the 2d Virginia Regiment in the latter 1750s. Posey, whose home, Rover’s Delight, stood near the Potomac River about a mile southwest of ... Read More

Philadelphia merchant Clement Biddle (1740-1814) served during the Revolutionary War as commissary general of forage for the Continental army with the rank of colonel, 1777-80, and as ... Read More

George William Fairfax (1724–1787), a relative of Thomas, Lord Fairfax, proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia, was the the son of William (1691-1757) and Sarah Walker Fairfax. He was ... Read More

John Randolph (c.1728-1784) practiced law in Williamsburg. He also served as attorney general of the colony of Virginia from 1766 to 1774 and was an outspoken Loyalist during the Revolutionary War ... Read More

William Bronaugh (1730-c.1800), a first cousin of George Mason, held the rank of ensign at Fort Necessity and after the capitulation was given the rank of lieutenant, dated 20 July 1754. He took ... Read More

William Henry Fairfax (d. 1759), the younger brother to Bryan Fairfax, went to New York in the fall of 1757 and bought an ensign’s commission in the 28th Regiment of Foot. Though Virginia governor ... Read More

John Thornton (d. 1777) resided near Fredericksburg and represented Spotsylvania County in the House of Burgesses. He was a close associate of the Washington family, and during the French and ... Read More

Thomas Bullitt (1730-1778) served during the French and Indian War as a cadet with GW at Fort Necessity in 1754. In July of that year, he was commissioned an ensign, and was among the men later ... Read More

William Fitzhugh (1761–1839), the son of William Fitzhugh (1721-1798), served as a cornet and lieutenant in the 3d Continental Dragoons, from 1779 to 1783. He settled in Hagerstown, Md., where he ... Read More

Jacob Van Braam (1725-1784) was born in Holland and came to America in 1752. By 1753 he had settled in Fredericksburg where, with GW, he was a member of the Fredericksburg Masonic Lodge. In that ... Read More

Thomas Burris served in George Mercer's company during the Fort Necessity campaign. He was occasionally employed by GW as a messenger or courier between the frontier forts, Alexandria, and ... Read More

Christopher Gist (c.1706–1759), a prominent figure on the Virginia-Pennsylvania frontier, was born in Maryland. After early experience in surveying and exploration, he was living in northwestern ... Read More

Dr. Thomas Walker (1715–1794), a physician, merchant, land speculator, experienced explorer, and storekeeper in Fredericksburg. Walker had extensive landholdings and business interests throughout ... Read More

William Byrd III (1728–1777) was appointed, in the mid-1750s, a member of the Virginia Council. He lived at his family’s James River plantation called Westover, located in Charles City County, ... Read More

Thomas Gist (b. 1735), third son of Christopher Gist, was listed as an ensign on a return of the Virginia Regiment of 12 May 1758. Gist reached the rank of lieutenant before the Virginia Regiment ... Read More

Augustine (“Austin”) Washington (1720–1762) of Pope's Creek, Westmoreland County, Virginia, was GW’s half brother. He was married to Ann Washington.

John Carlyle (1720–1780) of Scotland was a prominent merchant of Alexandria, Va., and one of the founders of that city. He was a partner in the Alexandria firms of Carlyle & Adam and of ... Read More

John Hunter served for a time as justice of the Elizabeth City County, Va., court and as colonel of the county’s militia. He lived near Hampton, where he was also a merchant. During the French and ... Read More

John Washington (1740–1777), the brother of Lund Washington, was resident overseer of the Dismal Swamp Land Company’s operations in the swamp.  Before the Revolutionary War John Washington resided ... Read More

Wilson Miles Cary (1734-1817), a brother of GW's friend Sarah Cary Fairfax, owned several estates, including Ceelys and Carysbrook in Elizabeth City County, Va., and Richneck in Warwick County, ... Read More

David Kennedy of Winchester, Va., rose to the rank of lieutenant in GW’s Virginia Regiment in the 1750s and served for a time as its assistant commissary and quartermaster. Between 1766 and 1773 ... Read More

Lawrence Washington (c.1718-1752) was GW's eldest living half brother, the son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and his first wife, Jane Butler Washington. He attended Appleby School in England ... Read More

George Clinton (1739–1812), a native of Ulster County, N.Y., and a lawyer by profession, was elected to the Second Continental Congress, where he took his seat with the New York delegation in May ... Read More

Born in England, George Lee (1714-1761) later removed to Virginia, and resided at Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Virginia. In 1738 he married Judith Wormeley of Middlesex County, Va., though ... Read More

Samuel Washington (1734–1781), the eldest of GW’s three younger brothers, left Ferry Farm in the mid–1750s and settled on a 600–acre plantation in the Chotank district of Stafford County, Va., ... Read More

William Crawford (1732-1782), brother of Valentine Crawford and husband to Hannah Vance Crawford, was, in 1755, commissioned an ensign in the company of scouts attached to the Virginia Regiment. ... Read More

Daniel McCarty (d. 1792), son of Daniel McCarty (d.1724), was a wealthy planter living at Mount Air on Accotink Creek in Fairfax County. He was married to Sinah Bell McCarty (d. 1798) with whom he ... Read More

Henry Woodward was in the British navy and came ashore with Braddock’s army when it landed in Virginia in the spring of 1755. He was made a captain in GW’s reconstituted regiment in September 1755 ... Read More

From 3 May 1762 to 26 Oct. 1763, GW employed William Dangerfield's (Daingerfield) slave, Guy, as a bricklayer. GW paid for Guy's room and board, but billed Dangerfield for a trowel and clothing ... Read More

Book page


Subscribe to Military and Supporting Services